Pathways to the Bench: African American History Month

Video profiles of seven African American federal judges, who overcame obstacles on their paths to the bench, are featured on the federal courts’ website. In their inspirational first-person narratives, they recount the challenges they faced growing up and offer uplifting insights. The four-minute videos are part of the federal courts’ Pathways to the Bench series.

Dialogue on the Fourteenth Amendment

The American Bar Association Dialogue program provides lawyers, judges and teachers with the resources they need to engage students and community members in a discussion of fundamental American legal principles and civic traditions. This Dialogue on the Fourteenth Amendment is composed of three parts:
Part 1: Equal Protection and Civil Rights – Participants discuss the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment and consider how Congress, through federal legislation, has worked to help realize its constitutional promise.
Part 2: Incorporating the Bill of Rights examines the concept of incorporation. Using a case study of Gitlow v. New York, this section provides a guide to how courts have applied the Bill of Rights, selectively, to the states using the 14th Amendment.
Part 3: Ensuring Equality and Liberty explores how the 14th Amendment has been interpreted by courts to protect fundamental freedoms, including individuals’ right to marry.

The Vietnam War Lesson Guide

Explore classroom lesson plans related to Ken Burns’s and Lynn Novick’s 10-part, 18-hour documentary series, The Vietnam War, which tells the story of one of the most consequential, divisive and controversial events in American history. The series explores the human dimensions of the war through the testimony of nearly 80 witnesses from all sides.

Grades 9-12
Federal Government
Audio

Our Flag

“Traditionally a symbol of liberty, the American flag has carried the message of freedom to many parts of the world. Sometimes the same flag that was flying at a crucial moment in our history has been flown again in another place to symbolize continuity in our struggles for the cause of liberty.”
Our Flag, a Congressional publication, briefly describes the history of the flag, and sets forth the practices and observances appropriate to its display (Senate Document 109-18). 2007.

Created Equal

The Created Equal project uses the power of documentary films to teach about the changing meanings of freedom and equality in America. The five films that are part of this project – “The Abolitionists,” “Slavery By Another Name,” “Freedom Riders”, “Freedom Summer” and “The Loving Story” – tell the remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo, from slavery to segregation.

Grades 6-12
Federal Government
Lesson Plans

Separation of Powers: Grades 3-5

This lesson is designed to be used in conjunction with the National Constitution Center’s Separation of Powers show, which is available as part of themed museum packages for groups and the Traveling History & Civics Program for schools.

Together, they show students firsthand how the three branches of government work together through separation of powers and checks and balances.

Separation of Powers: Grades 6-8

This lesson is designed to be used in conjunction with the National Constitution Center’s Separation of Powers show, which is available as part of themed museum packages for groups and the Traveling History & Civics Program for schools.

Together, they show students firsthand how the three branches of government work together through separation of powers and checks and balances.

Separation of Powers: Grades 9-12

This lesson is designed to be used in conjunction with the National Constitution Center’s Separation of Powers show, which is available as part of themed museum packages for groups and the Traveling History & Civics Program for schools.

Together, they show students firsthand how the three branches of government work together through separation of powers and checks and balances.

Connecting the Separate Powers

In this lesson, students will gain an understanding of the separation of powers using role playing and discussion. Students will identify which parts of the Constitution provide for the branches of our government, and will categorize public officials into one of these three branches.

The Civil War and Reconstruction

Why was the Civil War fought? How did Reconstruction change the relationship between the federal government, the states and the people? This video lecture explores these questions. It’s part of an online course taught by University of Pennsylvania law professor Kermit Roosevelt III. “Introduction to Key Constitutional Concepts and Supreme Court Cases” covers the topics: Where does the Constitution come from? How has it changed over the years? How do we know what it means?

Grades 8, 9-12
Foundations of Democracy
Video