Vietnam War: 1945-1975

This free curriculum guide from the New-York Historical Society considers the Vietnam War, examining the perspectives and experiences of those on the war front and the home front to facilitate understanding of one of the most complex chapters in American history. Materials consider the actions of presidents and the public between 1945 and 1975.

Grades 6-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Modules (Teaching Unit)

Importance of Health

Students will examine excerpts from different primary source documents to understand the importance that George Washington placed on being proactive about personal health. After the examination, students will create their own health diaries, like Washington.

Starter Kit: How a Bill (Really) Becomes a Law Podcast

We at Civics 101 adore Schoolhouse Rock and that sad little scrap of paper on the steps of the Capitol. But today we try to finish what they started, by diving into the messy, partisan, labyrinthine process of modern-day legislation.
This short episode includes a one-page Graphic Organizer for students to take notes on while listening, as well as discussion questions on the back side.

Grades 7-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Audio

Starter Kit: Executive Branch Podcast

In this episode of our Starter Kit series, a primer on the powers of the President, both constitutional and extra-constitutional. What can a president do? How long do a president’s actions reverberate? Why don’t we do treaties anymore?
Also, a super-inefficient mnemonic device to remember the 15 executive departments in the order of their creation.
This short episode includes a one-page Graphic Organizer for students to take notes on while listening, as well as discussion questions on the back side.

Grades 7-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Audio

Starter Kit: Checks and Balances Podcast

We exist in a delicate balance. Ours is a system designed to counterweight itself, to stave off the power grabs that entice even the fairest of us all. The U.S. government is comprised of humans, not angels, so each branch has the power to stop the other from going to far. The only catch being, of course, they have to actually exercise that power. In this episode, with the inimitable Kim Wehle as our guide, we learn what those checks actually are, and how the Executive, Legislative and Judicial branches (ostensibly) keep things democratic.
This short episode includes a one-page Graphic Organizer for students to take notes on while listening, as well as discussion questions on the back side.

C-SPAN’s Impeachment Site

This site contains resources to help you teach about the historical and constitutional background of Congress’ impeachment power. You will find coverage and featured clips of the second impeachment and Senate trial of President Donald Trump; lessons on Congress’ role and history of impeachment; and Bell Ringers on the impeachment of Presidents Bill Clinton and

Grades 6-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Media

The Presidents Featured Resource Site

On this site, you will find C-SPAN Classroom content for each of the 46 U.S. presidents. Resources include biographies from the newly developed C-SPAN’s Virtual Presidents Exhibit as well as C-SPAN Classroom content that explore the lives and legacies of these chief executives. Content for each president may include an infographic, Bell Ringers, lesson plans, and video clips.

Grades 6-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Media

The Electoral College

Today, the American people vote for president and vice president on Election Day. But, technically speaking, these votes don’t directly determine the outcome of the election. These popular votes determine which electors will be appointed to the Electoral College, which is made up of 538 electors drawn from the states and the District of Columbia. Each state is granted a different number of electoral votes based on the size of its congressional delegation. The electors meet after the general election to cast their votes for president and vice president.

Article II: The Executive Branch

Article II lays out the Executive Branch of the government, headed by the chief executive, also known as the president. The branch is responsible for enforcing the laws. The article outlines the requirements to be president, the election process, and the duties of the office. Learn all about Article II in the National Constitution Center’s learning module.

Grades 5, 6-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Modules (Teaching Unit)