C-SPAN’s Impeachment Site

This site contains resources to help you teach about the historical and constitutional background of Congress’ impeachment power. You will find coverage and featured clips of the second impeachment and Senate trial of President Donald Trump; lessons on Congress’ role and history of impeachment; and Bell Ringers on the impeachment of Presidents Bill Clinton and

Grades 6-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Media

The Presidents Featured Resource Site

On this site, you will find C-SPAN Classroom content for each of the 46 U.S. presidents. Resources include biographies from the newly developed C-SPAN’s Virtual Presidents Exhibit as well as C-SPAN Classroom content that explore the lives and legacies of these chief executives. Content for each president may include an infographic, Bell Ringers, lesson plans, and video clips.

Grades 6-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Media

The Electoral College

Today, the American people vote for president and vice president on Election Day. But, technically speaking, these votes don’t directly determine the outcome of the election. These popular votes determine which electors will be appointed to the Electoral College, which is made up of 538 electors drawn from the states and the District of Columbia. Each state is granted a different number of electoral votes based on the size of its congressional delegation. The electors meet after the general election to cast their votes for president and vice president.

Article II: The Executive Branch

Article II lays out the Executive Branch of the government, headed by the chief executive, also known as the president. The branch is responsible for enforcing the laws. The article outlines the requirements to be president, the election process, and the duties of the office. Learn all about Article II in the National Constitution Center’s learning module.

Grades 5, 6-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Modules (Teaching Unit)

Congressional Power of Impeachment

In the Constitution, the Congress is given the sole power of impeachment and removing the President and all civil officers from office. This power of Legislative Branch provides a significant check over the Executive and Judicial Branches. This lesson provides explanations of the Constitutional basis of the power, the process for removing officials and the history of impeachments and removing these officials from office. It also provides discussions on the standards of impeachments and how those are interpreted by Congress.

Grades 8, 9-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Lesson Plans

Civic Friendship: ‘I Am Rooting Hard for You’

“You will be our President when you read this note. I wish you well. I wish your family well. Your success now is our country’s success. I am rooting hard for you.”
It doesn’t sound like a note that a politician would write to the man who had just defeated him in a hotly contested election for the highest office in the nation just a few months prior, yet these are the exact words penned by President George H.W. Bush to his successor, newly inaugurated President Bill Clinton, on January 20, 1993. Many of the tributes to the former president recounted the story of this note as evidence of the character of the man, of his grace and humility. In this eLesson, students will explore the importance of character traits like humility and respect in the individuals who hold public office and how commitment to the rule of law has sustained the executive branch throughout the country’s history.

Grades 9-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Lesson Plans

Impeachment Proceedings

The process of impeachment was outlined in the Constitution when it was drafted in 1787. To date, 19 officials, including judges, cabinet members, senators, and presidents, have been impeached and stood trial. The crimes these individuals have been charged with range from perjury to conspiracy to intoxication on the bench. It is important to note that impeachment is not the actual removal from office, but merely the process to remove an official.

Grades 9-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Lesson Plans

Inauguration Day Resources

In this collection, you will find resources for teaching about the inauguration, news lessons surrounding the 2020 election, ways to help students engage in civil discourse, ideas for student civic engagement, strategies for discussing controversial issues in the classroom and more resources about the foundations of democracy and government.

Presidential Inaugurations, Past and Present

Every four years, on the steps of the U.S. Capitol building, the newly-elected President of the United States is inaugurated. This event not only includes the president taking the oath of office, but also provides the opportunity for the new President to lay out the direction he hopes to take the country. By analyzing historic texts and visuals, students can find common themes as well as important differences when comparing different inaugurations.

Grades 8, 9-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Modules (Teaching Unit)