Anyone Home? Using Political Cartoons to Consider the Lawmaking Process

This secondary level lesson plan, developed in collaboration with the National Archives, draws on the legendary political cartoons of Clifford Berryman to consider the lawmaking process. Students analyze the cartoon and describe how it illustrates the process. It aligns with both Common Core ELA standards and C3 Framework components.

Grades 6-12
Legislative Branch/Congress
Editorial Cartoons

Snyder v. Phelps (2011)

Can individuals/organizations be held liable for intentional infliction of emotional distress when commenting on matters of public concern? This case summary shows how the Supreme Court answered this question in 2011.

Grades 9-12
Judicial Branch/Supreme Court
Research (Digests of Primary Sources)

Civil Rights in Pennsylvania

Throughout the twentieth century, blacks in Pennsylvania employed numerous strategies to achieve the civil rights they deserved. Their efforts for to receive their rights began with a strategy of New Deal liberalism in the 1940s and 50s headed by prominent black leaders. When attempts to rewrite the laws using the established political system failed, black leaders encouraged more direct action, like boycotts and sit-ins. The movement quickly took on a black nationalist approach. Philadelphia became the perfect place for several Black Power conferences and home of the short-lived, though active, Black Panther Party.

Grades 9-12
Rights and Responsibilities
Primary Sources

Kyllo v. U.S. (2001)

Is the warrantless use of a thermal imaging device to detect heat emissions from an individual’s home a reasonable search? This case summary shows how the Supreme Court answered that question in 2001.

Grades 9-12
Judicial Branch/Supreme Court
Research (Digests of Primary Sources)

Citizen Me (Lesson Plan)

Students learn that they are citizens at many levels of society: home, school, city, state, and nation! Students create a graphic organizer that diagrams rights and responsibilities at these different levels of citizenship. They also learn the sources of their rights and responsibilities at each level. This lesson stands alone or may be used to reinforce the iCivics game Responsibility Launcher. We also recommend following with the iCivics lesson, “The Global You.”

Grades 6, 7, 8
Rights and Responsibilities
Interactives

Patriotism Crosses the Color Line: African Americans in World War II

Professor Clarence Taylor reminds us of the role African American soldiers played in the conflict—and the role their military service played in shaping the racial politics that followed in peacetime. This essay helps us appreciate the complexity of mobilization for modern warfare and drive home the impact of events on the world stage upon domestic affairs. Registration is required to view this resource.

Constitution Homepage on DocsTeach.org

Bring the Constitution to life

Locate primary sources from the holdings of the National Archives related to such topics as “checks and balances,” “representative government,” all 27 amendments, and other concepts found in the Constitution. This special home page devoted to the U.S. Constitution also features activities to share with students, such as “The Constitution at Work,” which uses primary sources to demonstrate the Constitution in action in our everyday lives.

Grades 5, 6-12
Federal Government
Assessments