Newseum

The mission of the Newseum is to champion the five freedoms of the First Amendment through education, information and entertainment. One of the top attractions in Washington, D.C., the Newseum blends news history with up-to-the-second technology and hands-on exhibits, and its Newseum Institute serves as a forum for First Amendment study, exploration and education. The Newseum is a 501(c)(3) public charity funded by generous individuals, corporations and foundations, including the Freedom Forum.

Featured Resources

Fact Finder: Your Foolproof Guide to Media Literacy

Are your students savvy searchers? Can they spot the difference between a straight news article and an opinion piece? Do they recognize bias in their sources … or in themselves?
Tackle these challenges and more using Fact Finder’s 11 flexible, multimedia lesson plans. Eight skill-building lesson plans introduce essential media literacy concepts through engaging explainer videos and colorful infographics that help students revisit, retain and apply the key concepts. The accompanying News or Noise? Media Map provides a collection of examples ready for students to analyze and evaluate with the support of worksheets and discussion prompts. Three reporting lesson plans help students take what they’ve learned and apply it to their own content creation, inspired by the issues that matter to them.

Media Literacy Booster Pack

Staying fresh and fluent in today’s media landscape isn’t easy. This collection of resources offers tools to tackle eight pressing challenges, from recognizing bias and propaganda to leveraging your role as a media contributor.

Free registration is required to access this resource.

Evaluating Election Ads

In this activity, students examine some of the techniques political campaigns use in ads to persuade voters, including assertions of fact and appeal to emotion. Students evaluate these techniques over time by comparing and contrasting historic and contemporary political ads.

Making a Change: The First Amendment and the Civil Rights Movement

See how advocates for — and against — change in the civil rights era leveraged the five freedoms of the First Amendment to make their voices heard. Students will also examine how news outlets’ choices on how to present a story can influence public opinion.

The Fundamentals of News

Students learn why news matters and how to distinguish between the different media-related terms they might hear being thrown around.

Source: Can I Trust the Creator?

Students dig into an article to determine whether they can trust the story by investigating its producers and the sources within. In doing so, they gain tools for evaluating news articles outside of class for accuracy and reliability.

Weed Out Propaganda

A bold digital poster outlines a simple acronym — S.E.E.D. — to help students learn to spot propaganda by recognizing four of its key techniques. Students analyze historical propaganda and understand that it is a marketing tool used to promote a variety of causes.

Is This Story Share-Worthy? Flowchart

Students use an infographic to gauge the value of a news story and weigh what they should do with it. This also teaches students about their personal responsibility to evaluate news articles before passing them on.

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https://newseumed.org/

555 Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Washington, D.C., 20001

Organization Type: Nonprofit