Perspectives

A blended learning program that distills rigorous behavioral science research into practical skills that help improve students’ communication, sense of belonging, and openness to diverse perspectives. Anyone can use the program, but we make Perspectives free to educators and their students.

Grades 9-12
Foundations of Democracy
Interactives

Protecting the Independence of the Judiciary from Disinformation

Disinformation threatens the independence of the judiciary. In this lesson, students will analyze and find examples of disinformation as it relates to; bots, ads, sock puppets, memes, and inauthentic domains. After understanding the types of disinformation, students will read Chief Justice Roberts’s 2019 End of Year Report to find out the power of disinformation and

Interactions Between the Branches

Article III of the Constitution is short compared to the Articles for Congress and the President. In these lessons, students will explore different documents to determine what the role of the judiciary is and why it is important that it was set up to be independent. Students will explore past and present efforts to adapt

The Supreme Court and the 1876 Presidential Election – Video

In 1876 the outcome of the presidential election between Samuel Tilden and Rutherford B. Hayes was decided by a 15-member Commission, which included 5 Supreme Court Justices. Usually, the Hayes-Tilden election is taught as the event that ended Reconstruction, but this 15-minute video adds to that story. It examines the nuts of bolts of presidential

Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Court-packing Controversy -Video

In 1937 President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced his plan to enlarge the Supreme Court to as many as 15 justices. Congress debated the merits of the plan and Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes opposed it. After 168 days the bill failed, but the lessons from the Court-packing episode are relevant today. This 15-minute documentary designed

Lessons Plans for “Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Court-packing Controversy”

These lesson plans for basic high school and for AP US History have been created for students who have watched the video. They include activities such as analyzing part of the text of FDR’s Court-packing Plan,  interpreting political cartoons reacting to the plan, and discussing the intersection of the three branches of government. 

Landmark Supreme Court Case – New York Times v. United States (1971)

New York Times v. United States, better known as the “Pentagon Papers” case, was a decision expanding freedom of the press and limits on the government’s power to interrupt that freedom. President Richard Nixon used his executive authority to prevent the New York Times from publishing top secret documents pertaining to U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. In a 6-3 decision, the Court ruled that the President’s attempt to prevent the publication was a violation of First Amendment protections for press freedom. This lesson has students explore the background of the New York Times v. United States, the arguments made during the case and its legacy.

Grades 11, 12, 9, 10
Executive Branch/Presidency
Media