Rules, Rules, Rules

In this lesson, students are asked to play a game – passing an object, such as an eraser – in which the rules are unclear and keep changing. Students are then asked to actively reflect on when and why rules are important and necessary. The leader might then connect rules of the game to the rule of law, and discuss the importance of law in our communities and in our society.

George Washington’s Rules of Civility in the Age of COVID-19

In 1745, a young George Washington copied down a set of rules in his workbook. His aim was to learn how to properly conduct himself in society. He took his examples from the writings of a 16th-century Jesuit priest. The rules Washington recorded still resonate today as we learn how to navigate the health crisis the world is now facing while trying to maintain civil behavior.

Structures, Powers, and Functions of Congress

Teachers can assign the materials in this lesson as homework or use them to create stations in their classroom in which students can understand how the House of Representatives and Senate differ in their structures, powers, rules, and functions. After students have gone through the lesson, teachers can assign one of two practice exercises to assess how much they understood from their lesson.

Rights in Conflict: The Case of the Professional Tap Dancer

In this lesson, the leader presents students with a situation in which one person’s rights conflict with another’s. The students will identify the problem, suggest solutions, and discuss the potential outcomes of their proposed solutions. The leader encourages students to think about which solutions are most fair, and can use the situation to illustrate the importance of having and adhering to clear rules ahead of time.