No Pets Allowed

In this lesson, students learn not only that there is a need for rules, but that it is important to understand why a rule was made in order to obey it sensibly. This activity explores the purpose and intent of rules or laws and helps students realize that overly simple laws are difficult to interpret and good laws are difficult to write. This lesson is a good introduction to the writing of the Constitution and the role of legislators in developing laws.

  • Resource Type: Lesson Plans, Modules (Teaching Unit)
  • Subject: Legislative Branch/Congress
  • Grades: K, 1, 2, 3

No Weapons Allowed

In this lesson, students learn not only that there is a need for rules, but that it is important to understand why a rule was made in order to obey it sensibly. This activity explores the purpose and intent of rules or laws and helps students realize that overly simple laws are difficult to interpret and good laws are difficult to write. This lesson is a good introduction to the writing of the Constitution and the role of legislators in developing laws.

  • Resource Type: Lesson Plans, Modules (Teaching Unit)
  • Subject: Rights and Responsibilities
  • Grades: 7, 8

Constitution Day Across the Country

Various free, downloadable lessons across grades K through 12 to facilitate providing educational programs on Constitution Day. These interactive lessons teach about the development and evolution of the U.S. Constitution. Students are able to express themselves through discussion and debates while engaging in various activities.

  • Resource Type: Audio, Lesson Plans
  • Subject: Rights and Responsibilities
  • Grades: K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

When Rights Conflict: Wisconsin v. Yoder

Many of the most important conflicts in our society are not between good and evil, but between two goods. Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, for example, much debate has revolved around the conflict between security and liberty. Often, these kinds of conflicts play themselves out in the courts, ending up before the Supreme Court. In this lesson, students analyze a case study involving a conflict between two goods—education and religion.

  • Resource Type: Lesson Plans, Modules (Teaching Unit)
  • Subject: Judicial Branch/Supreme Court
  • Grades: 5, 6, 7, 8