The Bill of Rights in Modern Times

In this lesson, students will learn about the individual rights that are included in the Bill of Rights and current issues relating to them. Students will use C-SPAN Classroom’s Constitution Clips to explore what each of these rights mean and determine how these rights apply to current events in America. This lesson works well with classes with one-to-one devices or in flipped classrooms.

Grades 12, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
Rights and Responsibilities
Interactives

Talking with Your Students About the Assault on the Capitol

The Constitutional Rights Foundation has created three classroom activities to help you and your students discuss abiding questions about the events of January 6 and the meaning of those events while encouraging thinking about the future of American democracy — and how to strengthen it. Students discuss hopes for the future, multiple perspectives on partisanship, and different headlines from the day after the assault on the Capitol.

Civics in Real Life

Civics in Real Life is a simple-to-use resource that ties in to what’s going on today. On this page, updated regularly through the school year, you will find concise resources that explore a civics concept or idea connected to current events. Simply click on the resource to download the PDF and share with your students!

Teaching About Race and Racism

Racism is never justified.

The Share My Lesson team has curated a collection of free lesson plans and resources to support teachers in educating students about racism and stereotyping. This collection includes resources connected to the events in Charlottesville, VA, in 2017, as well as in-depth activities for students to explore racism, stereotyping, perceptions and bias, as well as racial profiling. These resources can assist in making classrooms safe places for civil discourse.

Grades 10, K, 11, 1, 12, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Citizenship
Lesson Plans

March on Washington: Lesson Plans & Resources

On August 28, 1963, approximately 250,000 people participated in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, which is considered to be one of the largest peaceful political rallies for human rights in history. Among other events, the march participants gathered at the Lincoln Memorial to hear Martin Luther King Jr. deliver his iconic “I Have a Dream” speech. Many consider The Great March on Washington to be the event that encouraged the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The Share My Lesson team has created this collection of free lessons and classroom materials to help middle and high school educators teach their students about this historic event.

Grades 6-12
Rights and Responsibilities
Lesson Plans

Women’s History Month Lesson Plans & Resources

The Share My Lesson team has curated a collection of free preK-12 lesson plans and class activities for educators to use in order to incorporate key figures and historical events into their Women’s History Month lesson planning. This Share My Lesson collection spans topics like women’s suffrage and women’s rights and features influential women in science, social justice and sports.

Grades 5, 6-12, 3, 4
Rights and Responsibilities
Interactives

Forced Displacement: Human Rights and the Struggle for Social Justice

Annenberg Learner has curated a list of resources for students and teachers about the global refugee crisis and the related topic of immigration. Engage students with activities, lesson plans, and other professional development resources about these topics.