We the People Open Course

This course takes you from the philosophical foundations of the U.S. Constitution through the modern interpretation and application of its ideals. You will find videos of noted scholars explaining key aspects of the Constitution and online exercises to check for understanding. The course follows the We the People: The Citizen & the Constitution Level 3 (high school) textbook, which has been used throughout the country to further understanding of our government and its fundamental principles.

Grades 10, 11, 12
Foundations of Democracy
Assessments

‘If You Had Something Powerful’

“If You Had Something Powerful” is Constituting America’s Best High School PSA winner, created by Laura Leigh Hicks. We all have something that we love treasure, rely on, others want, others died for, all put in a document for us. This We the Future Contest video explains the freedoms we love and challenges students to now read it. All this in a one-minute PSA.

Grades 4, 5, 6-12
Foundations of Democracy
Media

‘Everything: Why Citizens Should Know Their U.S. Constitution’

Do your students need to have a reason to learn about the Constitution? Constituting America’s Best College PSA winner Emily Kitzmiller gives multiple reasons in “Everything.” In one minute, this fantastic classroom starter erupts with who, what, where, when and why the Constitution is significant to your students.

Grades 4, 5, 6-12
Foundations of Democracy
Interactives

‘It’s An American Thing!’

Looking for ice breakers for classroom starters? Can 30 seconds make a difference in your classroom? Constituting America’s Best High School PSA by Dakare Chatman, “It’s an American Thing!” creates thought, excitement and a challenge for your students. You need a method to begin class? Look no further.

Grades 4, 5, 6-12
Citizenship
Interactives

The American Constitution In Emoji

Emojis are taking over the world, and the U.S. Constitution is no exception. Kevin McCraney is the We the Future Contest’s winner for Best Grad School Short Film. He gives us positive and negative aspects of the Constitution. He also asks: “Should robots participate in our society with the same rights as people?” Kevin’s use of emojis and his intriguing questions will keep your students’ attention and generate more discussion than one class period allows.

Grades 6-12
Foundations of Democracy
Media

Constitution: Analyze – Explore – Music

Students will engage in a study of the Constitution to learn about the nature and structure of the United States. The Constitution will be analyzed and discussed as a primary source to understand the form of government and principles of the U.S. This lesson provides students an opportunity to explore how the government works and what the Constitution means to them today. Students will create a song to demonstrate understanding of the Constitution and nature of the U.S. government. Constituting America has a song contest teachers may want to integrate with this lesson plan.

Grades 7-12
Foundations of Democracy
Lesson Plans

The Role of the Judiciary

In this lesson, students learn about the judicial system, aka the judiciary. First, students read and discuss an article on the role, structure, and principles of the judiciary. Next, they participate in a Civil Conversation on the reading. In this structured discussion method, under the guidance of a facilitator (the teacher), participants are encouraged to engage intellectually with challenging materials.

Grades 9-12
Judicial Branch/Supreme Court
Descriptive Text

The Emoluments Clause and the President (Civil Conversation)

The emoluments clause is a provision in the U.S. Constitution. An emolument is a profit or advantage an official gains from his or her office. The framers of the Constitution feared that ambassadors in the early republic might be corrupted by gifts from foreign countries. The framers wanted public servants to be free from outside influence.

Grades 10, 11, 12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Lesson Plans