C-SPAN’s Impeachment Site

This site contains resources to help you teach about the historical and constitutional background of Congress’ impeachment power. You will find coverage and featured clips of the second impeachment and Senate trial of President Donald Trump; lessons on Congress’ role and history of impeachment; and Bell Ringers on the impeachment of Presidents Bill Clinton and

Grades 6-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Media

The Presidents Featured Resource Site

On this site, you will find C-SPAN Classroom content for each of the 46 U.S. presidents. Resources include biographies from the newly developed C-SPAN’s Virtual Presidents Exhibit as well as C-SPAN Classroom content that explore the lives and legacies of these chief executives. Content for each president may include an infographic, Bell Ringers, lesson plans, and video clips.

Grades 6-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Media

Separation of Powers

Instead of placing authority in the hands of one person, like a king, or even a small group of people, the U.S. Constitution divides power. Power is first divided between the national, or federal government, and the state and local government under a system known as Federalism. At the federal level, the Constitution again divides power between the three major branches of our federal government: the legislative, the executive, and the judicial. Discover the battles of the branches in the National Constitution Center’s learning module.

Federalism

“Federalism” is the word used to describe the Constitution’s system of dividing political power between the national government and the states. What is federalism and how does it work? Why did the founders build federalism into our constitutional system and what are the modern debates over federalism today? Explore the National Constitution Center’s Federalism learning module to learn more!

The Electoral College

Today, the American people vote for president and vice president on Election Day. But, technically speaking, these votes don’t directly determine the outcome of the election. These popular votes determine which electors will be appointed to the Electoral College, which is made up of 538 electors drawn from the states and the District of Columbia. Each state is granted a different number of electoral votes based on the size of its congressional delegation. The electors meet after the general election to cast their votes for president and vice president.

Article II: The Executive Branch

Article II lays out the Executive Branch of the government, headed by the chief executive, also known as the president. The branch is responsible for enforcing the laws. The article outlines the requirements to be president, the election process, and the duties of the office. Learn all about Article II in the National Constitution Center’s learning module.

Grades 5, 6-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Modules (Teaching Unit)

Impeachment Proceedings

The process of impeachment was outlined in the Constitution when it was drafted in 1787. To date, 19 officials, including judges, cabinet members, senators, and presidents, have been impeached and stood trial. The crimes these individuals have been charged with range from perjury to conspiracy to intoxication on the bench. It is important to note that impeachment is not the actual removal from office, but merely the process to remove an official.

Grades 9-12
Executive Branch/Presidency
Lesson Plans

Inauguration Day Resources

In this collection, you will find resources for teaching about the inauguration, news lessons surrounding the 2020 election, ways to help students engage in civil discourse, ideas for student civic engagement, strategies for discussing controversial issues in the classroom and more resources about the foundations of democracy and government.