iCivics

iCivics was founded by Justice Sandra Day O’Connor to develop new and innovative approaches to civic education. Its game-centered curriculum provides students with the tools they need for active participation and democratic action. The curriculum is grouped into topical units that align to state and Common Core standards. Teachers in a wide variety of classrooms have successfully used iCivics, and their students are knowledgeable, engaged and eager to participate in civic action and discussion

Featured Resources

Voting Rights (Lesson Plan)

Explore the evolution of voting rights in the Unites States through an interactive PowerPoint presentation highlighting landmark changes. Following the presentation and class discussion, students apply the new knowledge of voting legislation to individual scenarios through a class activity. This lesson is one in a series called “Civil Rights.”

Why Government? (Lesson Plan)

Students take a look at two political thinkers that spent a lot of time trying to answer the question, “Why Government?” – Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. This lesson combines our Influence Library entries on these men and adds activities that ask students to compare and contrast Hobbes and Locke and to think about how these philosophers influenced those that followed in their footsteps. This lesson is one in a series entitled “Foundations of Government.”

Do I Have a Right? (Game and Teacher Guide)

In Do I Have a Right?, your students run a law firm that specializes in constitutional law. Clients bring various complaints, and students must identify if they “have a right.” As students successfully resolve cases by matching them with the correct attorneys, their law firm grows along with the skills of their lawyers.

Congress in a Flash! (Lesson Plan)

Need to teach the legislative branch in a hurry? This lesson is designed to cover the basics in a single class period. Students learn what Congress is, what the Constitution says about the legislative branch, and how a bill becomes law. They analyze some actual language from the Constitution, compare the House and the Senate, and simulate the lawmaking process by reconciling two versions of the same fictional bill. This lesson is one in a series entitled “The Legislative Branch.”

Win the White House (Game and Teacher Guide)

In Win the White House, your students take on the role of presidential candidate from the primary season all the way through to the general election. The player strategically manages time and resources to gain control of as many electoral votes as possible over a ten-week campaign. This can only be done by effectively communicating his or her position on issues, and mastering media and public appearances.

Citizen Me (Lesson Plan)

Students learn that they are citizens at many levels of society: home, school, city, state, and nation! Students create a graphic organizer that diagrams rights and responsibilities at these different levels of citizenship. They also learn the sources of their rights and responsibilities at each level. This lesson stands alone or may be used to reinforce the iCivics game Responsibility Launcher. We also recommend following with the iCivics lesson, “The Global You.”

Argument Wars (Game and Teacher Guide)

In Argument Wars, students will try out their persuasive abilities by arguing a real Supreme Court case. The other lawyer is their competition. Whoever uses the strongest arguments wins!

Do I Have a Right?: Bill of Rights Edition (Game and Teacher Guide)

In the Bill of Rights edition of Do I Have a Right? your students run a law firm that specializes in constitutional law, specifically the rights protected in the Bill of Rights. Clients bring various complaints, and students must identify if they “have a right.” As students successfully resolve cases by matching them with the correct attorneys, their law firm grows along with the skills of their lawyers.

Immigration Nation (Game)

Do you know how people become citizens of the United States? In Immigration Nation, you’ll find out as you guide newcomers along their path to citizenship.
Students learn the range of allowable circumstances for legal residence and the requirements for naturalization and full citizenship.

Slavery: No Freedom, No Rights (Lesson Plan)

Examine the history of slavery in the United States. Trace the development and expansion of slavery in the 19th century and learn about the conflicts and compromises that occurred prior to the Civil War and the abolition of slavery.

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