2016 Naturalization Ceremonies

Students will participate in real-life civics lessons at naturalization ceremonies scheduled at National Park Service sites and other iconic places from Ellis Island to Pearl Harbor in celebration of Constitution Day and Citizenship Day on Friday, September 16, 2016.

This year, as part of the federal courts’ annual, national initiative, federal judges will swear in new citizens at courthouses, cultural landmarks, national parks, and historic places as part of the Park Service’s 100th anniversary year observance.

September 17 is the official anniversary of the signing of the Constitution in 1787, but naturalization ceremonies are scheduled almost every day the week before that date. This year, during the third week of September, federal judges will administer the Oath of Allegiance at such national treasures as the Lincoln Memorial, in Washington, D.C.; Appomattox Courthouse National Historical Park, in Appomattox, Va.; the Great Smoky Mountains, near Knoxville, Tenn.; the Herbert Hoover National Historic Site, in West Branch, Iowa; and the Battleship USS Missouri Memorial, in Hawaii.

For more information about student participation in naturalization ceremonies, or schools hosting ceremonies for Constitution Day and Citizenship Day in 2017, contact the national outreach manager for the federal courts, Rebecca Fanning, at rebecca_fanning@ao.uscourts.gov.

Teaching the Reconstruction Amendments

While Reconstruction is arguably the least well known and most misunderstood era in U.S. History, the Reconstruction Amendments are among the most important for understanding our government, politics, and law. The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments were intended to profoundly reshape the Constitution so much so that many scholars refer to their provisions as part […]

Get a Jump on Constitution Day Planning!

You’ll be ready in a snap when you sign up for the Civics Renewal Network’s Preamble Challenge event! Join hundreds of schools across the nation on September 16 this year and celebrate Constitution Day! Our free, online Teacher Toolkit gives you everything you need for your classroom activity. Lots of fun, creative ideas help make […]

AP Conference – 2016

Here is a summary of the Civics Renewal Network workshop at the College Board AP Conference in July 2016. Recrafting the Constitution: 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments While Reconstruction is arguably the least well known and most misunderstood era in U.S. History, the Reconstruction Amendments are among the most important for understanding our government, politics, […]

Happy Fourth of July!

Celebrate Independence Day with an excellent resource from the Library of Congress, just one of hundreds of resources available at CivicsRenewalNetwork.org. Be ready for Constitution Day before school opens this year. Sign up now for the Civics Renewal Network’s Preamble Challenge, a fun and easy way to fulfill the Byrd Amendment’s requirement that educational institutions […]

Introducing the Newly Redesigned DocsTeach.org

The National Archives’ DocsTeach.org has a new look and updated features! In response to educators’ feedback, the popular teaching website is now easier to use, more customizable, and provides a more complete experience for students. And now, thousands of primary sources and all the document-based activities are accessible on mobile devices, including tablets. Not familiar […]

Attending the College Board AP Conference in July?

AP teachers! Are you going to the College Board AP Conference in Anaheim, Calif., on July 13-16? Visit the Civics Renewal Network at Booth 402 in the exhibit hall. And join us at our session on “Recrafting the Constitution: the 13th to 15th Amendments” on Saturday, July 16, from 2:45-4 p.m. at the Hilton Anaheim, […]

Explore Great Resources on Two Landmark Cases

This month, the anniversaries of two important Supreme Court decisions are celebrated. Fifty years ago, on June 13, the justices decided Miranda v. Arizona, which established that suspects must be told of their rights to counsel and against self-incrimination before police questioning. Now the Miranda warning, which begins “You have the right to remain silent…,” […]

Brown v. Board, presidential race, Constitutional Convention

Check out these highlights from our resources on the Constitutional Convention, which began on May 25, 1787; the landmark Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education, which was decided on May 17, 1954; and on the executive branch as your students follow the presidential race. The Constitutional Convention: Four Founding Fathers You May Have […]

Free Constitution Course Available On Demand

Introduction to Key Constitutional Concepts and Supreme Court Cases explores the Constitution’s origins and its changes over the years, from the initial burst of amendments that brought us the Bill of Rights, through the bloody disruption of the Civil War and into the 20th and 21st centuries. It discusses landmark Supreme Court cases that show […]